This ain’t no Xanadu

A couple weeks ago I had a dream. I awoke from it feeling awed and sad, and confused as to why that should be so, since there was nothing in it that was overtly saddening. Indeed my dreaming-self was impressed by the vision I was having, but always in the background was a tint of sorrow, that upon awakening, only grew stronger. So I wrote what I dreamed in my notebook, and as I wrote, the reason for my sorrow became clear. Two nights prior to the dream, I had watched part of a documentary on the plight of polar bears in the face of global warming. I was unable to finish watching it. It was too heartbreaking to see cubs drown in storm-tossed seas that should have been ice; too agonizing to watch a starving mother and her cub digging in rubbish for food when the seals are plentiful. The saddness hit harder than I had thought, for two nights later this is the dream I had, as I recounted it in my book:

The mountian is tall and craggy, dark with iron, massive red against the pale blue sky. The path up to the lake is wide and true, ducking under massive red stone arches winding around the body of the Red Mountian. The lake at the top, at the foot of the summit, is half-frozen and it shimmers a crystaline blue under the shadows of the Peak. A deep, glacially carved gorge at the end of the lake feeds a massive waterfall, where the dark waters of the lake crash onto the broken rocks below the towering summit. On the lake, people play. Some skating, some swimming, some sunning on towels set up on the red shore. And above them all is the rocky finger of the peak, slicing the heavens as if to touch the stars. The mountian had once been covered in ice, and no one could conceive that its stones were red, and now its sticks out like a sore thumb against the green and brown earth below it. The lake was once a glacier; only the vauge skelton of its form remains. And people come to gawk at the red peak, to swim its vanishing waters, to tan their skin under its shadow, while the waterfall pours out melting ice as if the mountian were weeping.

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13 thoughts on “This ain’t no Xanadu

  1. I watched a documentary tonight called “The Eleventh Hour” which had some stuff on the polar bears. It is heart-rending.

  2. I thought the second paragraph was beautifully written.

    I’d feel a little more sorry for the polar bears if I didn’t live in Australia where golbal warming has taken a great toll on all of here on the driest place on Earth.

  3. jen: I dont know what it was. I came into it somewhere in the middle and stopped watching it 20 minutes later.

    citizen: maybe thats the show I saw so little of?

    orhan: so, youre saying the sun cooked all the sympathy out of your head? LOL yeah Ive heard that Australia has bad UV radiation pollution, from the thin ozone layer. Cant even go out in the afternoon, right?

  4. Dreams can be so telling. Their metaphors are often absolutely gripping. You can understand so much about people and what they are feeling through their dreams. I don’t take dreams lightly. Sometimes dreams even foretell the future.

    Thanks for the puppy comment! Isn’t she beautiful?! I love her little tongue, too! : D

  5. Dreams can be so telling. Their metaphors are often absolutely gripping. You can understand so much about people and what they are feeling through their dreams. I don’t take dreams lightly. Sometimes dreams even foretell the future.

    Thanks for the puppy comment! Isn’t she beautiful?! I love her little tongue, too! : D

  6. I often think the best thing that could happen would be for humanity to blow itself right off the fact of the earth.

    We deserve no better.

  7. Haha, no its not that bad over here. While we have the highest rate of skin cancer per capita in the world it is definitely safe to take a stroll down the road on a hot summers day, thankfully. Our problems with the sun relate more to drought striken farmlands where our food and clothing come from. The hotter it is the more it costs to live. And thats not considering how little fresh water we have as oppose to the amount we had at the beginning of the decade.

    Yay, balance.

  8. what a sad and weighty dream. I watched a show on Nat. Geo channel regarding the changes in our planet and how its affected the species. Basically the point boiled down to the planet will heal itself over time as past devastation has. However, we are going to make ourselves extinct with what we are doing with the planet. Obvious thought it may be, That message gave me nightmares.

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