Newsday Tuesday #6: Teens and Reckless Driving Edition

This story inspired this week’s Newsday Tuesday. A 17 year old with a
history of reckless driving, accidents, and a DUI kills himself, his 14
year old sister, and her 15 year old friend, last Thusday, in Wolcott,
CT.

First though, here’s some factoids about teen driving.

Now the news:

A history of reckless driving takes its toll, legally as well as
practically.

Teens phyisologically too immature to drive safely? Should the legal
driving age be raised to 18 or 21?

Nevada imposes more regulations on their graduated driver licensing
program
. Sounds like something all states should consider doing!

High school advertising competition highlights reckless driving among
teens.

Houston offers invites local teens to compete for new car: only the
safest and smartest driver will win!

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Newsday Tuesday #6: Teens and Reckless Driving Edition

  1. Personally, I like the idea of lax drinking laws and later licensing. Drinking at 16 and driving at 18. Let the kids figure out alcohol before they learn to drive. I’m also for increase public transportation and its use. But, what do I know.

  2. Personally, I like the idea of lax drinking laws and later licensing. Drinking at 16 and driving at 18. Let the kids figure out alcohol before they learn to drive. I’m also for increase public transportation and its use. But, what do I know.

  3. Pool: I think those are great ideas! I would never have thought of lowering the drinking age, but the idea of it sounds good–supervised drinking experiments so the appeal of booze is reduced.

    However, there are lots of drunkards out there, knowing alcohol as well as they do, continue to drive when they shouldn’t be. So many people think they are “fine” and can handle a vehicle, when in reality, they are impaired. The problem with alcohol is that it impairs self-judgment, especially when combined with social laxity and the devil-may-care additude so prevalent at parties and bars.

    So the question is, would reversing the order of legality really teach people not to drink and drive?

    Ah, I love conundrums!

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